• Tips & Modifications

    Tip

    Laminate the individual sheets of the MapMaker Kit map so you can re-use it for several years.

    1. Draw ocean currents on a world map.

    Display the Ocean Conveyor Belt cartoon from the Resource Carousel. Explain to students that this is a depiction of ocean currents called the Ocean Conveyor Belt. The ocean conveyor belt is caused by differences in water temperature and salinity. Also known as thermohaline circulation, the conveyor belt is a system in which water moves between the cold depths and warm surface in oceans throughout the world. Have students draw the Ocean Conveyor Belt on the World Physical MapMaker Kit.


    2. Mark the location of a 1992 cargo ship spill of rubber ducks.

    Have students mark 44N, 178E on their maps. Tell students that in this location, in 1992, a cargo ship full of bath toys spilled nearly 92,000 rubber ducks into the Pacific Ocean. These ducks traveled thousands of miles on ocean currents, providing new information about these currents. For example, the first group of ducks to make landfall washed up on the shores of Alaska.


    3. Apply Ocean Conveyor Belt information to predict the movement of rubber ducks.

    As a class, have students predict where the ducks traveled, based on the Ocean Conveyor Belt. Have students mark the map with a different color where they think the ducks washed up on shore.


    4. Test predictions by reading about the ducks' actual paths.

    Have students read about where the ducks traveled using the RubaDuck website, found in the Resource Carousel. Have students mark these locations on the map, using a different colored marker than used to mark predictions. Ask: How accurate were our class predictions? Explain that there are many ocean currents in addition to the ocean conveyor belt, and many of the ducks traveled on those smaller currents. Show students the Ocean Currents layer on the MapMaker Interactive to see the paths of those smaller currents. Discuss which smaller currents might have influenced the ducks' travels.

    Extending the Learning

    Using the MapMaker Interactive, have students look more closely at the smaller currents that affected where the ducks traveled. Ask: What differences do you notice in the currents? Students should notice that currents are different temperatures. Some ocean currents are warm and some are cold, as indicated by the red and blue arrows on the map. Discuss how differences in water temperature create movement in the water. This type of movement is called thermohaline circulation. Warm water is less dense than cold water, meaning that cold water will sink below warm water. Show the Ocean Conveyor Belt cartoon from the Resource Carousel again and discuss how differences in water temperature relate to the Ocean Conveyor Belt.

  • Subjects & Disciplines

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:

    • use current events to explore the ocean conveyor belt

    Teaching Approach

    • Learning-for-use

    Teaching Methods

    • Brainstorming
    • Cooperative learning
    • Discovery learning
    • Discussions
    • Research

    Skills Summary

    This activity targets the following skills:


    National Standards, Principles, and Practices

    National Geography Standards

    • Standard 1:  How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information
    • Standard 3:  How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface
    • Standard 4:  The physical and human characteristics of places

    Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts

    • Principle 1c:  Throughout the ocean there is one interconnected circulation system powered by wind, tides, the force of the Earth’s rotation (Coriolis effect), the Sun, and water density differences. The shape of ocean basins and adjacent land masses influence the path of circulation.
  • What You’ll Need

    Materials You Provide

    • Markers

    Required Technology

    • Internet Access: Required
    • Tech Setup: Printer
    • Plug-Ins: Flash

    Physical Space

    • Classroom

    Setup

    Wall or floor space large enough to hang a giant map

    Grouping

    • Large-group instruction
    • Small-group instruction

    Other Notes

    Print out and assemble the map as a class or on your own before class. Use the assembly video provided to help with this process. If you do not have room for the large map, print several tabletop maps for the students to use in small groups.

  • Background Information

    The ocean conveyor belt is caused by differences in water temperature and salinity. Also known as thermohaline circulation, the conveyor belt is a system in which water moves between the cold depths and warm surface in oceans throughout the world. "Thermo" means temperature and "haline" means salinity.


    Prior Knowledge

    • None

    Recommended Prior Activities

    • None

    Vocabulary

    Term Part of Speech Definition Encyclopedic Entry
    cargo Noun

    goods carried by a ship, plane, or other vehicle.

    circulation Noun

    moving in a circular motion.

    current Noun

    steady, predictable flow of fluid within a larger body of that fluid.

    Encyclopedic Entry: current
    ocean Noun

    large body of salt water that covers most of the Earth.

    Encyclopedic Entry: ocean
    ocean conveyor belt Noun

    system in which water moves between the cold depths and warm surface in oceans throughout the world. Also called thermohaline circulation.

    Encyclopedic Entry: ocean conveyor belt
    oceanography Noun

    study of the ocean.

    Encyclopedic Entry: oceanography
    predict Verb

    to know the outcome of a situation in advance.

    thermohaline circulation Noun

    ocean conveyor belt system in which water moves between the cold depths and warm surface in oceans throughout the world.

    For Further Exploration

    Websites

Funder

Oracle